Posts Tagged ‘$ per millisecond’

What is the value of quality?

January 4, 2013

Some organizations survive by reducing their price of nonconformity from 40% to 20% of revenue. These organizations inspect and audit to stop bad quality from reaching the customer. Reducing the price of nonconformity (PONC) is their laudable quest. If the organization served no customers or delivered no product, PONC would be zero! Quality management therefore requires another metric.

The term “value of quality” makes us think about this. Customers pay for whatever they value. They buy when they are confident that what they buy will fulfill their needs. These needs include affordability. Therefore, we manage quality to deliver value. This includes preventing loss.

Organizations prosper by ensuring they add value faster than their competitors do. They ensure their organizational management systems enable employees to add value quickly. Organizations apply this thinking (summarized as $ per millisecond) when developing, using and optimizing their management systems to deliver more value even faster. Consequently, they can earn a lot more with services and products that are highly valued by more customers.

Leading organizations design, make and deliver services and products that exactly fulfill the needs of their intended customers. They avoid waste in hitting this target. They learn of new needs and new ways to add value – faster and perpetually. They know that sorting good product from bad (aka inspection) slows the velocity of adding value. They know that falling short of customer needs wastes valuable resources. They know that exceeding customer needs, in terms of what they value, increases costs without reward. They may reach a design dilemma: features that do not fulfill customer needs are a waste but delivering more features than customers initially say they require may expose needs not fulfilled by competitors.

The product and its outcomes may include the customers’ wider perceptions of value. Customers used not to care how well their favorite company treated its suppliers or paid its taxes. Increasingly even the most loyal customers care enough about any suffering in how the product is made. Imagine destroying a valuable brand by misusing it as a tax dodge. Customers and employees care about global organizations paying taxes where they work and live. They value social responsibility enough to influence their buying decisions and their career choices.

Hence, quality includes value as perceived by our customers as well as services and products free of nonconformity. Organizations develop, use and improve their management systems to enable employees to add value faster while preventing loss sooner.

$ per millisecond

August 31, 2011

How fast does your organization add value?

All work should help other people. In this context all work is service. We also know that all work is process. Work should add value or enable another process to add value. When our work depends on the successful interaction of several different functions we need a management system to help us so we are all doing the right things the right way at the right time.

Besides paying customers, our communities, our families, our colleagues, ourselves and our employers – the people receiving the results of our work are stakeholders.

Management systems should inform us of the requirements critical to success. Management systems should deliver to us, on-time and defect-free, the inputs to which our work must add the value. Management systems should deliver the necessary resources and controls so we understand and can agree customer requirements. As part of the management system leaders coordinate our work and cause all of us to care passionately for each other’s requirements.

In short, the management system enables us to earn a living and our organizations to exist.

Sometimes our system slows us or stops us from adding value because its core or support processes, the inputs, resource or controls are late, ineffective or defective in some other way.

Two questions remain: “how fast does your management system enable your core processes to add value and what are doing with your management to hasten the rate it adds value?”