Archive for March, 2014

The process approach

March 31, 2014

All work is process. While organizations continue to employ humans supported by machines, instead of the other way around, here is a working description of the process approach.

As workers, we enjoy our work because it makes the best use of our strengths, gifts or talents. Collectively or individually, we work to fulfill the purpose of our organization. Apart from caring about our employer’s purpose or mission, we also care about the requirements for our work so we can add value for others. Our employer invests in processes, facilities, equipment and controls so our work adds value faster and its results (services with or without goods) meet customer requirements with no need for verification.

Complex products need process teams comprising members of different areas of expertise who help each other to fulfill requirements.

As process designers, we plan, design and specify plans and procedures for the successful completion of our processes. We may document our plans and procedures as necessary to avoid making bad product.

We monitor our processes for conformity and effectiveness, correcting them as necessary. We may also collect data on the characteristics or behavior of our processes to avoid adding variation. These data also become information for our investment decisions to improve, or not, the process directly or indirectly via the system of which it is part.

As auditors, we’re authorized to sample parts of the process and its system to verify the fulfillment of process objectives and the adequacy of interactions (communications), resources and controls.

The process approach ensures employees have all they need to avoid wasting their time at work while creating customers who create customers.

When the process is repeatable and reproducible, for a given product, investors may automate it so machines replace the humans. We then are glad that we learned other ways for our work to add value for others.