Archive for December, 2012

Playing our part in value networks

December 22, 2012

Stakeholders may dream of having their requirements satisfied by the organizations that affect them. Some politicians and NGOs say the stakeholders have the right to have their requirements fulfilled. Others say that stakeholders, who can, should earn that right. It is intensely political as the forces for “equal opportunities” fight the forces for “equal outcomes”.

Organizations can understand themselves as systems and then develop their process-based organizational management systems to enable workers to add value faster and prevent loss sooner to benefit all stakeholders. They reward employees for working to benefit customers so employees can look after their families, their communities and themselves.

Businesses network and these networks comprise many different organizations so they are complex. Members may organize themselves to become a value network. Organizations are the nodes in the value network. Each node interfaces with other nodes that use contracts to govern their relationships as customers and as suppliers. Building, supporting and running a value network requires transparent, voluntary, consensus standards. Some of these standards specify more reliable management systems. Organizations develop and use their management systems to govern their work. They may even show they are ethical and competent enough to join and remain members of the value network. Once a supplier promises a standard, customers may use contracts to enforce even the voluntary standards. Organizations can and do impose strict selection and re-selection criteria on the members of their value networks.

Of course, the leaders and managers of the value networks and the organizations that comprise these networks should personally be transparent and accountable. However, to encourage risk taking to generate wealth, the individual decision makers are largely protected by their organization becoming the person accountable in the eyes of the law.

This separation of the organization from the people that run it creates mistrust. How then are customers confident enough to do business? Personal relationships count for a lot in making and accepting promises. The organizational management system helps salespeople and sales processes to make and keep competitive promises for their customers.

Customers and other stakeholders rely more and more on the law to protect them from poor decisions and broken promises. Organizations can see the rules are changing and want to stay ahead by broadening their duty of care to include customers, employees and communities. Indeed, the 2006 Companies Act in the UK reminds company directors of these wider duties.

Now we see companies climbing on the long bandwagon named “Sustainability for ALL Through Being Socially Responsible in Everything We Do”. Even if it were available, ISO 26000 certification would not “prove” social responsibility or sustainability credentials.

Instead, organizations have to perform to prove their heads, hearts, decisions and actions are socially responsible to their stakeholders. Stakeholder trust may then grow from websites that truth-check the social responsibility and sustainability claims of any organization. Indeed, stakeholders may fund these websites directly or indirectly.

Instead of publishing socially irresponsible versions of “greenwash”, may we see more leadership by global companies benefiting their stakeholders wherever they operate?