Archive for September, 2011

Reasons ISO 9001 projects fail or succeed

September 26, 2011

Big Q thinking says everything the organization does is for quality. Organizational thinking in this way can result in highly successful holistic system development projects. Some organizations, though, are stuck in little-q thinking, perhaps kept in that state of mind by their dying QC department.

Since 1986 here are four reasons we have observed for organizations failing to obtain the full benefits of ISO 9001:

1. The leaders are not willing volunteers in developing their system.
2. The leaders ignore the system that actually is their organization.
3. The leaders delegate implementation of procedures written around ISO 9001 instead.
4. The quality professionals do not include the financial processes in the management system.

The key to developing a process-based management system is to go with the flow of work in the organization.

Embark on a voyage of discovery rather than implementing a standard:

A. Discover what the organization already does to determine customer requirements (and get paid for meeting them).
B. Discover what the organization already does to fulfill these and other requirements.
C. Discover the processes in the management system (and determine any new ones needed by the management system).
D. Discover what is done in each process to prevent nonconformity instead of how nonconformity is detected.

Telling an individual to implement ISO 9001 is not a good idea. The system development project needs a cross-functional team that is able to analyze its system, determine its key processes and analyze each of those key processes and their interactions.

Just a few of the management system’s processes need to be newly designed and implemented after training of the process team.

Respect the system that is the organization otherwise the system development project will fail. One way to do this is to use the “as-is rule”. Document the process lightly as it is not as you would like it to be. Then, by using and improving the management system it will cause any needed improvements and grow the detail where needed.

What if the process is so bad it does not conform to the standard? Well then, use the two-week rule: record the nonconformity and say “you have a fortnight to correct the process then we will re-document the improved process as it is”. If too difficult to correct in two weeks then feed the nonconformity into an early corrective action using the newly developed management system.

A summary of common mistakes:

i) Leaders not showing their commitment to requirements.
ii) Putting the documented procedure ahead of the process.
iii) Ignoring the system that is the organization.
iv) Implementing ISO 9001 instead of developing the organization’s existing management system.

The system should help people to determine and meet requirements including the requirement for continual improvement. The procedures should be owned by the people not the “we know best department”. That way QA is delivered as a result of everyone using their management system to fulfill requirements.

Learn how to do this for yourselves here.